J N Darby – in Christ I find my Life, my Strength, and my Object

John Nelson Darby (1800-1882)

There are three things the law could not do.  It could not give life, and, even supposing we got life, it does not give strength; and, another thing of deepest moment for our souls, it does not give us an object.  But in Christ I find my life, my strength, and my object.  “They that are after the Spirit, do mind the things of the Spirit”; they have the true object.  I get in Christ an object that is sufficient to delight God Himself.

(J N Darby, Collective Writings vol. 31 p155.)

Golden Nugget Number 336

 

 

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Adam failed –  Christ  Replaces Him

ublicly, the Church has fallen like all the rest. Grace will produce and perfect its own work. Christ’s building will be complete and perfect, and manifested in glory. But Man’s building is defective and corrupt, and will come under the worst and severest of judgments.

 

JohnNelsonDarbyThe Law

In Exodus 20, God gave Moses the law.  Within days Israel had made a golden calf, breaking the first commandment.  The stones were broken.

In a future day, when Christ comes to reign, the law will be written upon the heart of Israel (See Jer 31:33).

 

The Priesthood

In Leviticus 10, the priesthood failed, Nadab and Abihu offered strange fire.  The result was that Aaron was forbidden to enter the sanctuary, except on the great day of atonement, and then not in his garments of glory and beauty.

On the other hand, Christ is now in glory as a merciful and faithful High Priest.

 

The Kingdom of Israel

 

Though wise, Solomon failed.  He loved strange women, and the kingdom was divided.  It was ultimately ended by Nebuchadnezzar.

However Christ, now in glory on His Father’s throne, will take the throne of David and reign over Jews and Gentiles.

 

The Church

The Church was established here called to glorify Christ.  But evil workers (John called them antichrists) came and there was falling away. Paul prophesied that grievous, seductive wolves would come from within the church – they did.  But Christ will come to be glorified in His saints and admired in all them that believe (1 Thess 1:10).

Publicly, the Church has fallen like all the rest.  Grace will produce and perfect its own work.  Christ’s building will be complete and perfect, and manifested in glory.  But Man’s building is defective and corrupt, and will come under the worst and severest of judgments.

 

The conclusion of a paper by J N Darby ‘The Church – the House and the Body’ – Collected Writings Volume 14 (Ecclesiastical 3) – p.99

 

Sosthenes

 

October 2016

The Difference between Rules and Conscience

There is often confusion between obedience to rule and conscience: in fact one is the opposite of the other.

When we have rules there is an obligation to obey, without any consideration of right and wrong. On the other hand, conscience gives us a instinctive sense of right and wrong, following some inscrutable law

There is often confusion between obedience to rule and conscience:  in fact one is the opposite of the other.

When we have rules there is an obligation to obey, without any consideration of right and wrong.  On the other hand, conscience gives us a instinctive sense of right and wrong, following some inscrutable law

Man acquired the judgment of right and wrong following the fall. He became, as God put it, ‘as one of us knowing good and evil’ (Gen 3:22).  Prior from that he was not as God.   He was not holy for he could not abhor sin.  Sin was not in him, so he was unable to judge it.  He was under a law ‘do not eat’ which he had only to obey.

But grace has bought us out of the law, but put us under the authority of Christ as Lord.  Our obedience to Him is therefore not a matter of conscience.  But conscience does come in as we distinguish between what is right and wrong: looking to Christ as a model

In summary there are three things:

  1. Our responsibility to obey God – that is law.
  2. Our sense of good and evil – that is conscience,
  3. Our self-judgment, or repulsion of heart, when an evil act is contemplated – that is holiness.

Based on J. N. Darby: ‘Conscience’ – Notes and Comments Vol. 1, p 104

Sosthenes

August 2016

Darby on Romans 6 – Dead to Sin, Alive to God

Walking in the path of obedience to Him, the soul is delivered evil – will and lust – which is not obedience. We grow in the knowledge of God and in intimacy with Him. We cannot do this in our own will. But we live more in His things, and that is holiness: that is more than obedience. But that is the gift of God. The path to it is the path of obedience and holiness, but itself is the gift of God. Death is the wages of sin; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. The gift of God is nothing less than eternal life. God gives it to us.

RomeIn Romans 6 we have the practical consequence of deliverance from sin. in the first part of the epistle (Rom. 1:18; to 5:11) we read nothing as to practical conduct. The guilty sinner is cleared, but nothing is said as to our consequential conduct. The conclusion of Romans 5 is that by one Man’s obedience we have been made righteous, and that, by having part in Christ’s death, we have part in this righteousness.

But having part in death (that is, dying) is, of course, not the way to live. How shall we who are dead to sin live in it any longer?  By our profession of Christianity, we are baptised unto His death, the old man being judged and crucified. Now as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father (God’s power), so our life is to be a new resurrected one.

Our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin’ (v.6). This means that sin as a whole is annulled or rendered powerless: it has closed its existence. ‘He that is dead is justified from sin’ (v.7). Here it is not here sins or guilt: a dead man may have to answer for his sins, but he cannot sin: he does not have evil lusts nor a perverse will. However for us, the power of death has been destroyed by the resurrection of Christ. He came to take our place as sinners and deal with the question of sin: He died to sin, once for all. On the cross sin was the question – He was made sin. Now He is risen; He dies no more; death does not have dominion any longer. Now He lives and lives to God, sin having been done with for ever, to the glory of God

In His life down here Jesus served God perfectly. He lived by the Father, having Him always before His mind. Before He died on the cross, He had to do with sin – though He was sinless.   Sin was all around Him: it grieved Him; He was a Man of sorrows because of it, and He had to be made sin for us. In love He manifested God; as Man come to do God’s will, when fully proved to be the sinless One Himself – who knew no sin, he hath made sin for us (2 Cor 5:21). But now He has done with it for ever. Now He is risen into a new state as Man: in thought, object, and life, He lives to God. Now everything serves God’s glory. Though the flesh is always the same, the life of Jesus is manifested in our bodies (see 2 Cor 4:10). This is what the true Christian state is.

So we are to reckon ourselves dead to sin, and alive to God through Him, our old man being crucified with Him. We are not physically dead, but have a new and free life, alive to God, not through Adam, but through Jesus Christ our Lord. It is not that we never sin or lust; but we do not let sin obey its lust: we walk in the power of a new life. Instead of being slaves to sin, we hold the reins, and yield our members as instruments of righteousness to God.

Sin does not have dominion over us any longer, because we are not under law, but under grace. Being under law leaves us under the dominion of sin. What we need is freedom from the bondage of sin; for the law forbids sins, but gives us neither the life nor power to obey it. But under grace we have the power, sin having no dominion over us. The power comes from on high, so we are set really free, and can give ourselves to God willingly and freely. Shall we sin because we are not under a law which forbids it, and which curses us if I do it? God forbid!

Now Paul returns to the Gentile condition. If we yield ourselves to sin, we are its slaves. Even without law, death and the consequent judgment of God, were the appointed wages of sin.   But now we are alive to God, and that must involve obedience. Christ was the obedient Man: His Father’s will was the motive of everything He did. He lived by every word that proceeded out of the mouth of God. (See Deut 8:3). His path was practical righteousness, and He was the pattern of it. So the apostle thanks God that, whereas they had been slaves of sin, they had obeyed from the heart the form of doctrine that had been delivered to them (v.17).

It is the obedience of faith. As we receive the word of God into our hearts, we are linked with the life-giving God. It is the true life of Christ, the obedient Man. As free from sin, we yield ourselves to obey, becoming ‘slaves’ to righteousness. [Note that JND uses the word ‘slave’ here, whereas in the Darby Bible he uses the word ‘bondman’. A ‘slave’ is someone bought and owned by another. A ‘bondman’ on the other hand, is someone who was a slave, been given the opportunity for freedom, and has decided to remain for life in the service of their Master.]* Hence it is true liberty: we were fruitlessly wasting our members as slaves to uncleanness and lawlessness. Now we freely yield our members to be slaves to righteousness. The blessed result is holiness, our hearts separated to God, knowing Him, the soul brought into His image. ‘And have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of him that created him’ (Col 3:10).

This is the general doctrine: Christ having died, we reckon ourselves dead as if we had died. We have died – we have been crucified with Him, and, as Christians, we do not consider the flesh to be alive any more. I speak of all that has happened to Christ as if it had happened to me, because He is become my life, and I live by Him. I am a son whose father had not only paid his debts, but made him a partner in a business. He speaks of ‘our capital, our connections,’ though the son brought nothing into the business, everything having been done and acquired beforehand. We have therefore a living association with the Lord. It is neither ascension, nor union, nor resurrection with Him, but the death of the old man, and a new life in Christ with freedom from being slaves to sin. This is the full answer to the allegation that, having righteousness in Him, we have license to sin. Instead of sin reigning in our mortal bodies, having dominion over us, we enjoy subsisting power.

Walking in the path of obedience to Him, the soul is delivered evil – will and lust – which is not obedience. We grow in the knowledge of God and in intimacy with Him. We cannot do this in our own will. But we live more in His things, and that is holiness: that is more than obedience. But that is the gift of God. The path to it is the path of obedience and holiness, but itself is the gift of God. Death is the wages of sin; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. The gift of God is nothing less than eternal life. God gives it to us.

A simplified summary of part of the introduction to John Nelson Darby’s  Exposition of the Epistle to the Romans

* Acknowledgments to ‘Underground Theologian’ http://theologicalmuse.christianblogsites.com/blog/post/2009/04/24/slave-or-bond-servant

A Brief Outline of the Books of the Bible – Galatians

Galatians contrasts law with God’s promises, grace, and the Holy Spirit. It does not refer so much to righteousness, but shows that the law came between the promise and Christ.

Outline of Bible coverGalatians contrasts law with God’s promises, grace, and the Holy Spirit. It does not refer so much to righteousness, but shows that the law came between the promise and Christ. The law could not annul the promise: – it went only to Christ, by faith. He shows the independence of his ministry, stating that he was dead to the law which brought the curse – dead by the law, crucified with Christ, so that, as living, Christ lived in him, and he lived by the faith of the Son of God (chaps. 1, 2).

In chapter 3:20 the point is, that the fulfilment of an absolute promise depends only on the faithfulness of one. The law requires a mediator. Under Moses, two parties were implied, but God is only one. Hence, blessing under the law depends on the faithfulness of another as well as of God, and therefore, apart from Christ, all fails. The promise was confirmed before God to Christ. Christ came after the failure, and we rest on the work of the Mediator, and not on the work of a second party. The law was added to produce transgression, not sin.

Those who were under the law were delivered by Christ’s taking its curse; so that the blessing flows freely, and that they may receive the promise of the Spirit.

In Galatians, death is applied to the law, the flesh, and the world. In chapter 6 we find that the government of God applies to all men, and brings its attendant consequences.

Originally by JND.   Lightly edited by Sosthenes,  September 2014

– Se A Brief Outline of the Books of the Bible  for the original

A Brief Outline of the Books of the Bible – Exodus

In Exodus we find God visiting His people; redemption, and the establishment of relationships with His people. These relationships are presented in the testing of law, and the arrangements of grace.

lay-preachingIn Exodus we find God visiting His people; redemption, and the establishment of relationships with His people.  These relationships are presented in the testing of law, and the arrangements of grace.   God bears with His people, with the distinct purpose of dwelling with them, and making them dwell in a place He had prepared for them.   There are four immense principles – redemption, bringing to God, God’s dwelling among them, and consequently holiness.   Priesthood is established to maintain the relationship with God, when the people cannot be in immediate relation.   Connected with all this you have, the judgment of the world, and the final deliverance of the earthly people.  With Moses, the man of grace, you have Zipporah, who represents the church, whereas the people are witnesses of Christ’s abiding connection with Israel.

From the Red Sea to Sinai we find the whole picture of God’s dealings in grace in Christ by the Spirit on to the millennium, and the millennium itself.

In chapter 19 the people put themselves under law, and get law instead of worship founded on deliverance and grace.

Lightly edited by Sosthenes, May 2014